•  2019-2020 School Year
    Science

    College Planning: Students planning on education beyond high school may need extra science courses as prerequisites for admission to college, NCAA, or vocational programs. Students should contact the program of their choice for specific courses necessary for admission.
     
     

    Courses Shown Below

    Click title to see course description and prerequisites 
  • Applied Science
    Course: 6500
    Grade: 9
    Prerequisite: No other high school science courses have been taken. Students have not met the math requirements for Physics A and B. Students may not self-register for this course, instructor permission is required at the time of registration.
    The Applied Science course is designed to build foundational science skills and will address many of the science process and engineering standards. For those approved for the course, this will meet their ½ credit science elective. This course will discuss science method, and students will participate in experimental design, measurement, and data analysis. Topics covered will range from consumer science and energy issues to new research and product design.
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    Field and Forensic Biology A/B
    Course: 6501/6502
    Grade: 11-12blood splatter
    Recommendation: Completion of Chemistry or Physics prior to taking this course. Successful completion of these courses will satisfy the one credit in biology required for graduation.
    This course approaches the science of biology from the perspective of both a field ecologist and forensic scientists. In Field and Forensic Biology A, students will focus on science process, ecological interactions, biochemistry, evolution and cell biology. Students will engage in many lab experiments to simulate a forensic scientist trying to solve mysteries or crimes. Field and Forensic Biology B continues the study of biology where Field and Forensic Biology A ends. Students will explore the science of DNA and learn how to extract DNA from cellular material. They will use DNA and patterns of genetic inheritance to investigate and solve crimes. In addition, Field and Forensic Biology B will investigate the topics of metabolism, energy and ecosystem dynamics. Cumulative field biology and forensic skills will be applied to deepen the understanding of ecology and evolution. Students who received credit for Field and Forensic Biology A/B cannot receive credit for Biology A/B. Students who received credit for Biology A/B cannot receive credit for Field and Forensic Biology A/B.
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    Biology A/B
    Course: 6601/6602
    Grade: 11-12 
    Recommendation: Completion of Chemistry or Physics prior to taking this course. Successful completion of these courses will satisfy the one credit in biology required for graduation.
    What makes people sick? Why are people alive? What hidden worlds exist beyond people's eyes? Biology A takes students through a journey that investigates these questions as well as the nature of life and living organisms. Students become scientists as they discover organisms that inhabit both visible and invisible spaces. Students will pursue the nature of cells, life’s energy, and human body systems. The focus of this course is on problem solving in science through activities and lab investigations. Jeans or Genes? Join Biology B to crack the genetic code. Investigate past, present, and future secrets held in DNA. Heredity, adaptation, genetic engineering, selective breeding and mutation are some of the topics explored in Biology B. Students will learn to apply experimental techniques to discover how DNA and genes operate. Students will also link the structure and function of DNA and genes to evolutionary change and the struggle for existence. Students who received credit for Field and Forensic Biology A/B cannot receive credit for Biology A/B. Students who received credit for Biology A/B cannot receive credit for Field and Forensic Biology A/B.
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    Environmental Science
    Course: 6605
    Grade: 11-12 
    This is a course that focuses on the complexity of natural and environmental systems. Through the application of the scientific method, students will participate and initiate research projects that examine all aspects of environmental stability. In their research, students will analyze the way humans impact and interact with their natural environments, and learn what is being done to preserve and conserve environmental areas into the future.
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    Human Anatomy and Physiology
    Course: 6611
    Grade: 12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Biology credit

    This high life-science course is organized around the core principles of anatomy and physiology, such as homeostasis, chemical interactions, structure and function relationships, and the levels of organization. Modeled around an introductory college-level course, students will use scientific literature, class discussion, case studies, and specimen dissections to understand the details of eight major body systems. This class is a great option for students interested in pursuing a career in health care or a related field.  
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    AP Biology A/B/C
    Course: 6615/6616/6617Students in Bio Lab
    Grade: 11-12
    Prerequisites: Recommended math—successful completion of Algebra II (A & B). Completion of a full year of Chemistry or Physics.
    Ranger U AP Biology is a college-level biology course. The class offers highly motivated students an opportunity to gain college credit at the high school level or provide high school students with an extremely strong background in biology. The course creates the time and space for students to be scientists as they develop inquiry skills to answer classical and unique questions in the biological sciences. We will explore the four "Big Ideas' of biology as articulated by the College Board: Evolution, Energy, Information, and Systems. Each topic will be explored through labs and group discussions. At the end of the course, it is expected that a student in this AP class will take the Advanced Placement Exam for the course. AP national exams are offered in May. Successful completion of AP Biology A, B and C satisfies the biology graduation requirement.
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    Chemistry A
    Course: 6701
    Grade: 10-12 
    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Algebra 9B
    Chemistry A fulfills the 0.5 credit physical science graduation requirement for the graduating class of 2022 and beyond.
    Chemistry A and Chemistry B fulfills the 1.0 credit physical science graduation requirement for the graduating class of 2020 and 2021.

    Chemistry focuses on the interaction of matter and energy in chemical reactions. Concepts include periodic trends, chemical bonding, writing formulas for compounds and reactions, Students will perform experiments individually and collaboratively.
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    Chemistry B
    Course: 6702
    Grade: 10-12 
    Prerequisite:  Successful completion of Chemistry A.
    Chemistry B is an elective credit for the graduating class of 2022 and beyond, and highly recommended for students that wish to attend a 4-year university.
    Chemistry A and Chemistry B fulfills the 1.0 credit physical science graduation requirement for the graduating class of 2020 and 2021.

    This course is ideal for the student who asks the question: “Why are certain gases poisonous or why do some substances dissolve in water and others don’t?” Chemistry focuses on the interaction of matter and energy in chemical reactions. Concepts include, stoichiometry, acids and bases, gases, rates and organic. Students will perform experiments individually and collaboratively. Chemistry B allows for opportunities to complete several inquiry type labs.
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    AP Chemistry A/B/C
    Course: 6712/6713/6714
    Grade: 10-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry and Physics A and B (for the class of 2022 and beyond) AND completion of Google Survey.  https://goo.gl/forms/dKlTbfMmUeRF0s3u2
    This is a college-level chemistry course.  Students need to sign up for all 3 sections.
    Ranger U This course covers all of the standard chemistry topics such as atomic and molecular structure, bonding, periodic trends, thermodynamics, electrochemistry, chemical reactions, kinetics and equilibrium, etc. Students will develop lab skills using university-level equipment and techniques. It is expected that a student in an AP class will take the Advanced Placement Exam for that course. AP national exams are offered in May.
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    Meteorology
    Course: 6805
    Grade: 10-12
    Meteorology introduces students to basic weather concepts, instrumentation, and maps. Students will learn about various aspects of weather, including the atmosphere, seasons, severe weather, and much more. Weather data will be collected from instruments used by the students outside and around the school in addition to using data from the weather station on rooftop of Forest Lake Senior High. 
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    Earth and Space Science
    Course: 6806
    Grade: 11-12
    In this required course, students will investigate Earth and Space through four major units: space, plate tectonics, geologic time, and climate change. Students will explore star composition and galaxy motion using light evidence, read about Icelandic volcanoes, and evaluate the human interaction with Earth’s four spheres (atmosphere, geosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere). This course is offered in two different formats: traditional or hybrid (both in the classroom and online). Students enroll in the traditional course and are placed in the hybrid section through their dean.
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    Physics A/B
    Course: 6905/6906
    Grade: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 8B
    Physics A and Physics B fulfills the 1.0 credit physical science graduation requirement for the graduation class of 2020 and 2021.
    Physics A and Physics B is a required course for the graduating classes of 2022 and beyond.
    In Physics A, students will study Newton’s laws of motion and investigate motion, energy, and momentum. These investigations will include lab work, models, graphs, and mathematical equations. In Physics B, students will study sound, light, electricity, magnetism and heat through lab activities that drive our discussion and problem solving.
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    AP Physics 1A/B/C
    Course: 6907/6908/6909
    Grade: 9-12
    Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra 9B OR by written recommendation of a science teacher. This is a college level physics course.
    Ranger U Students need to sign up for all 3 sections of AP Physics and complete all 3 sections to fulfill the physics portion of the science standards needed to graduate.
    AP Physics 1 is an algebra-based, introductory college-level physics course. Students cultivate their understanding of Physics through inquiry-based investigations as they explore topics such as Newtonian mechanics (including rotational motion); work, energy, and power; mechanical waves and sound; and introductory, simple circuits. It is expected that a student in an AP class will take the Advanced Placement Exam for the course. AP national exams are offered in May. After the AP exam, additional topics surrounding light, magnetism, and heat will be studied so that this course meets the graduation requirements for 1 year of physics/chemistry.
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    AP Physics - Mechanics A/B (Calculus based)
    Course: 6910/6911
    Grade: 11-12
    Prerequisite: Enrollment in or completion of AP Calculus
    Ranger U This two-term course covers the study of motion at an advanced placement level . Topics include Newtons’ laws, accounting for friction, simple harmonic motion, circular motion, energy, and momentum. At the end of the Mechanics II term, students will participate in the Advanced Placement Physics C exam. It is expected that a student in an AP class will take the Advanced Placement Exam for that course. AP national exams are offered in May.
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    ALC Only:


    Ecology
    Course: 6600
    Minnesota is a biologically diverse state because we exist at the convergence of three major land biomes and we are home to three different freshwater biomes. In this course, students will study the characteristics of the biomes of the world with special attention being given to the biomes of Minnesota. During the course of this study, students will also learn about classification and claudistics, energy roles in an ecosystem, succession, chemical and biological water testing, and environmental issues facing Minnesota’s future.
    and Forensic Biology B.
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    Minnesota Forests
    Course: 6608
    Our diverse forests are one of the most unique characteristics of Minnesota’s natural resources. Students in this course will study basic plant biology and taxonomy as it pertains to Minnesota flora. Students will apply this new knowledge to design, set-up, and conduct a long-term inquiry based plant experiment. Students will also study the techniques used for various forestry field skills, positives and negatives of different logging techniques, forest pests and diseases, and spend time looking at the current environmental issues facing the health and future of our Minnesota forests.
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    Criminalistics
    Course: 6612
    Discover the differences between the Hollywood version CSI and true forensic science. This course is designed to investigate the real-world applications of using science in the analysis of crime scene evidence. Students will study the many jobs of the criminalist and learn how to apply forensic science principles through units focused on processing crime scenes, fingerprints, DNA, handwriting analysis, tool marks, blood and blood spatter, determining time of death, forensic anthropology, and forensic entomology.
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    Biology at the Extremes
    Course: 6620
    This course will study the of habitability of different environments in the universes. Students will discover the requirements that need to be met in order for an organisms to be considered living. Then the students will explore the physical requirements that an environment needs to provide in order to sustain life. This field of science searches for extreme habits on Earth and planets both within our solar system and elsewhere in the universe that could be habitable environments for life. Students will learn about the search for evidence that life may once have occurred on Mars or elsewhere in our solar system through the Mars rovers and various NASA space missions. Finally, students will study the ways in which living organisms have adapted and will have to adapt to survive the challenges that extreme Earth ecosystems can present and the challenges of surviving in the microgravity of space.
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